Hyundai Equus

Hyundai Equus
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What is it? After upgrading the engine and transmission of the Equus last year, Hyundai has turned its attention to the large luxury sedan’s styling and features.
The updated Signature base model has a 9.2-inch center screen to run Hyundai’s Blue Link Apps, such as traffic, weather, sports and stock data, and a 30-gigabyte jukebox. Move up to the Ultimate trim level and you get a full 12.3-inch display. Those big center screens give a good view for the backup camera.
The Equus now also comes with adaptive cruise control (which can stop and start the car automatically in slow traffic), a cross-view traffic alert, lane departure warning, and forward-collision warning. All Equus trims now include a 7-inch screen in the instrument cluster, stitched leather and wood on the dashboard, and three-zone automatic climate control. After focusing on its Chinese customers with a limo-like back seat, Hyundai says it has concluded they needed to upgrade the driver’s space for Americans.
What’s new or notable? In place of the old living-room-sectional quality rear seat, the 2014 model gets a three-across bench. It no longer has foot rests or gives massages, but it does have individually adjustable lumbar support, heating, and cooling. Rear-seat passengers can also control the navigation screen, audio system, and rear-zone climate from controls in the pull-down center armrest. And both rear-seat passengers get individual 7-inch LCD screens for watching movies or playing games.
CR’s take: When we tested an Equus in 2011, we found it plenty plush, but less engaging to drive than other luxury cars. The new model looks better suited to the American market. It could be a good bargain for consumers looking to pampered pampering.